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Energy

Get active and get energized!

Ever have that feeling where you’re completely exhausted and realize you haven’t really moved all day? Being physically active helps us feel more energized. With our energy levels boosted, we’re ready to tackle the task at hand – and we’ll be more efficient and effective, too!

A older man lifting a barbell with lightbulbs on end

How can physical activity give me more energy?

When you’re feeling sluggish, tired and sleepy, it’s easy to reach for candy, caffeine and sugary drinks. But did you know that they drain you of energy instead of helping1? The secret to unlocking more energy is getting quality sleep, drinking lots of water and moving your body.2

Although it seems counterintuitive to suggest a workout to combat fatigue, there’s good reason: getting your body moving results in marked increases in energy- and mood-enhancing neurotransmitters like dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine.3

Researchers found that sedentary, otherwise healthy adults who engaged in as little as 20 minutes of low-to-moderate physical activity per day, three days a week for six weeks, reported feeling less fatigued and more awake.4 So, make the time to energize yourself!

Two blue batteries

Here’s how:

  • Start your day off right with an invigorating workout such as boxing.
  • If you have a job where you’re stuck in one place, find ways to change position to keep your energy up through mid-day.
  • Head outside! Being in nature gives your mind an extra boost.6 A study even showed that just looking at a picture of nature can give you energy.7
  • Dancing has been shown to give you more energy and relieve tension,8 so put on some tunes and dance your troubles away.
  • Instead of going home after a long day to crash, grab your gear and hit the gym, or join some friends for basketball or ultimate frisbee!
  • Check out the free ParticipACTION app to track your progress and for ongoing motivation, articles and exercise videos.
A gym bag surrounded by boxing gloves, dumbbells and sneakers

References

  1. WOLFF, C. (2016). 9 FOODS THAT CAN DRAIN YOU OF ENERGY. RETRIEVED FROM https://www.bustle.com/articles/181405-9-foods-that-can-drain-you-of-energy-according-to-experts
  2. WEBB, M. (2011). EXERCISE AS A CURE FOR FATIGUE AND TO BOOST ENERGY. ACE FITNESS. RETRIEVED FROM https://www.acefitness.org/education-and-resources/lifestyle/blog/6589/exercise-as-a-cure-for-fatigue-and-to-boost-energy-levels
  3. PUETZ ET AL. (2006). EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXERCISE ON FEELINGS OF ENERGY AND FATIGUE: A QUANTITATIVE SYNTHESIS. PSYCHOLOGICAL BULLETIN, 132(6),866-876.
  4. PAYNE ET AL. (2012). INTERVENTIONS FOR FATIGUE AND WEIGHT LOSS IN ADULTS WITH ADVANCED PROGRESSIVE ILLNESS. COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 18;1:CD008427.
  5. LOPRINZI ET AL. (2011). ASSOCIATION BETWEEN OBJECTIVELY-MEASURED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND SLEEP, NHANES 2005–2006. MENTAL HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 4(2), 65-69.
  6. KAPLAN, S. (1995). THE RESTORATIVE BENEFITS OF NATURE: TOWARD AN INTEGRATIVE FRAMEWORK. JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 15(3), 169-182.
  7. BERMAN ET AL. (2008). THE COGNITIVE BENEFITS OF INTERACTING WITH NATURE. PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE, 19(12).
  8. ZAJENKOWSKI ET AL. (2015). LET’S DANCE – FEEL BETTER! MOOD CHANGES FOLLOWING DANCING IN DIFFERENT SITUATIONS. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SPORT SCIENCES, 15 (7).