Activity 117/150

Scavenger Hunt

A scavenger hunt is a game where players need to collect a number of pre-determined items in as little time as possible.
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History
It is believed that the idea for a scavenger hunt came from the actual practice of treasure hunting and was further inspired by Robert Louis Stevenson’s publication of Treasure Island.

Where
A large outdoor area is best for a scavenger hunt as it ensures a diverse number of articles can be searched for and participants have to cover a lot of ground in order to find each item. Nonetheless, a scavenger hunt can be organized inside with a list of items that are readily available inside a home, office or community centre.

How to play
A scavenger hunt is typically a party game where organizers prepare a list of items that kids (or adults) have to search for. Often players will work together in teams in order to find all of the items. The winner is the first individual or team to find everything on the list. There are variations of scavenger hunts that may not include finding items, but completing tasks, or taking photographs.
A scavenger hunt differs from a treasure hunt as the items collected in a scavenger hunt are typically random and of little value.

Suggested equipment
- Random items – can include items found in nature – leaves, acorns, etc…
- List
- Pen or pencil

Adaptations
Physical activity in Canada includes everyone, regardless of any ability or circumstance. Some sports and activities may, however, require a few adaptations to make them as accessible as possible. Below you’ll find recommendations and suggestions on how to accommodate individuals that may have limitations or different needs. With a positive attitude and a little ingenuity, any activity can be made enjoyable for all.
Sensory
Make your own rules for your scavenger hunt. Play indoors or outside. Have brightly coloured objects to find. Play with a friend. Have auditory cues or a have sighted guide. Participants know their needs best so be sure to include them in the planning of the activity.
Learning/Cognitive Disabilities
Make your own rules for your scavenger hunt. Play indoors or outside. Be creative with your objects. Make it fun and be creative. Participants know their needs best so be sure to include them in the planning of the activity.
Mobility Limitation
Make your own rules for your scavenger. Play indoors or outside. Be creative. Place your objects within the reach and disabilities of participants. Make it fun. Participants know their needs best so be sure to include them in the planning of the activity.

Benefits of Scavenger Hunt

The Canadian Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines outline the amount and type of physical activity you need at every age and stage of life. And, for the first time, the new 24-hour Movement Guidelines for Children & Youth also include sleep. Following the guidelines will help reduce the risk of chronic disease, lead to a more focused mind, a stronger, fitter body, and all in all, a more enjoyable life.

See Benefits and Guidelines

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Michelle Murray
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