Activity 2/150

Cycling

Riding a bike, or cycling, is a physical activity and a common form of recreation and transportation. It is also a competitive sport with competitions of differing lengths.

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History
Bicycles were introduced in the 19th century and now number approximately one billion worldwide. They are the principal means of transportation in many parts of the world. In Canada, cycling is both a means of transportation and both a recreational and vigorous physical activity.

Where
You can ride your bike in a city centre, on a trail through the forest or on a country road, making it a versatile and enjoyable activity.

How to play
Cycling is fairly straight forward once you learn how to balance on two wheels. Once able to stay upright on the bike, cyclists use their feet to move the pedals in a circular motion – this propels the bike forward. The terrain is a big differentiator when it comes to cycling. There is mountain biking, BMX and cyclo-cross that take place on rugged trails, track cycling that takes place on a man-made oval track, and Spinning that happens on a stationary bike in a studio. There are also tandem bikes with two riders, uni-cycles with one wheel, tricycles with 3 wheels, fat tire bikes, recumbent bicycles, hand cycles and rickshaws that act like taxis. For more information visit Cycling Canada.

Suggested equipment
- Bicycle
- Helmet
- Comfortable clothing

Adaptations
Physical activity in Canada includes everyone, regardless of any ability or circumstance. Some sports and activities may, however, require a few adaptations to make them as accessible as possible. Below you’ll find recommendations and suggestions on how to accommodate individuals that may have limitations or different needs. With a positive attitude and a little ingenuity, any activity can be made enjoyable for all.

Sensory

Biking is fun for everyone. Individuals who have poor balance may choose to ride a trike or cycle with a guide on a tandem bicycle. For more information on competitive cycling, contact Cycling Canada. For individuals who choose to, stationary biking is also a great way to get fit.

Learning/Cognitive Disabilities

Individuals who have poor balance may choose to ride a trike or cycle with a guide on a tandem bicycle. For more information on competitive cycling, contact Cycling Canada. For individuals who choose to, stationary biking is also a great way to get fit.

There are several types of bicycles that are suitable for individuals of varying needs.

Mobility Limitation

People who have lower limb restrictions can have fun cycling with a recumbent bike which is propelled by the arms and not legs. Individuals who have poor balance may choose to ride a trike or cycle with a guide on a tandem bicycle. For more information on competitive cycling, contact Cycling Canada. For individuals who choose to, stationary biking is also a great way to get fit.

There are several types of bicycles that are suitable for individuals of varying needs.

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Benefits of Cycling

The Canadian Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines outline the amount and type of physical activity you need at every age and stage of life. And, for the first time, the new 24-hour Movement Guidelines for Children & Youth also include sleep. Following the guidelines will help reduce the risk of chronic disease, lead to a more focused mind, a stronger, fitter body, and all in all, a more enjoyable life.

See Benefits and Guidelines

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CONTACT
Michelle Murray
Communications Coordinator